Collaboration between PTC and Stratasys for additive manufacturing

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ptc creo 3.0PTC and Stratasys announced the companies are working together to deliver a seamless experience between PTC Creo design software and Stratasys 3D printing solutions. The joint vision is to make additive manufacturing more accessible to designers and manufacturers and to allow them to fully realize the advantages of the technology. These advantages include geometric freedom and part functionality, economic low volume and on-demand manufacturing, the production of customized products. Today, designers and manufacturers typically need to use multiple tools along with 3D CAD software to design, optimize, and validate parts for 3D printing. This can be a cumbersome, inefficient, and sometimes a disconnected process that makes it difficult to accurately produce the final manufactured part. It may necessitate additional efforts and increase time and resources. “The goal of the integrated solution – the companies explain – is to define and deliver design for additive manufacturing. This is the ability to seamlessly create, optimize, validate and produce parts through the additive manufacturing process. PTC and Stratasys begin to deliver this vision by offering a seamless workflow from design to 3D print, now available in PTC Creo 3.0. This new integrated workflow streamlines the 3D printing experience by allowing users to perform informed design specification, file preparation, print optimization and print execution for Stratasys 3D printing solutions from within the PTC Creo environment. The first 3D printer which can take full advantage of the new joint solution is the Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 multi-color, multi-material 3D production system, which delivers 3D printed parts with multi-color and multi-material combinations, surface quality, color accuracy and functionality. Integration with additional Stratasys 3D printing solutions is planned for future releases”. PTC and Stratasys aim to drive further adoption of additive manufacturing across a wide range of industries, from automotive and consumer electronics to aerospace and defense.